The full list is below.   Rae Armantrout , “ Wobble ” Wesleyan University Press   Jos Charles , “ feeld ” Milkweed Editions   Forrest Gander , “ Be With ” New Directions   Terrance Hayes , “ American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin ” Penguin Books / Penguin Random House   J. Michael Martinez , “ Museum of the Americas ” Penguin Books / Penguin Random House   Diana Khoi Nguyen , “ Ghost Of ” Omnidawn Publishing   Justin Phillip Reed , “ Indecency ” Coffee House Press   Raquel Salas Rivera , “ lo terciario / the tertiary ” Timeless, Infinite Light   Natasha Trethewey , “ Monument: Poems New and Selected ” Houghton Mifflin Harcourt   Jenny Xie , “ Eye Level ” Graywolf Press  The judges for the category this year are Mary Jo Bang, the author of eight collections of poetry, most recently “ A Doll for Throwing ”; Ken Chen, the executive director of the  Asian American Writers’ Workshop ; Elise Paschen, whose most recent book of poems is “ The Nightlife ”; Danez Smith, whose book of poems “ Don’t Call Us Dead ” was a finalist for the 2017 National Book Award; and Stephen Sparks, the co-owner of the independent bookstore  Point Reyes Books .

The full list is below.

Rae Armantrout, “Wobble
Wesleyan University Press

Jos Charles, “feeld
Milkweed Editions

Forrest Gander, “Be With
New Directions

Terrance Hayes, “American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin
Penguin Books / Penguin Random House

J. Michael Martinez, “Museum of the Americas
Penguin Books / Penguin Random House

Diana Khoi Nguyen, “Ghost Of
Omnidawn Publishing

Justin Phillip Reed, “Indecency
Coffee House Press

Raquel Salas Rivera, “lo terciario / the tertiary
Timeless, Infinite Light

Natasha Trethewey, “Monument: Poems New and Selected
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Jenny Xie, “Eye Level
Graywolf Press

The judges for the category this year are Mary Jo Bang, the author of eight collections of poetry, most recently “A Doll for Throwing”; Ken Chen, the executive director of the Asian American Writers’ Workshop; Elise Paschen, whose most recent book of poems is “The Nightlife”; Danez Smith, whose book of poems “Don’t Call Us Dead” was a finalist for the 2017 National Book Award; and Stephen Sparks, the co-owner of the independent bookstore Point Reyes Books.

 The full list is below.   Carol Anderson , “ One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy ” Bloomsbury Publishing   Colin G. Calloway , “ The Indian World of George Washington: The First President, the First Americans, and the Birth of the Nation ” Oxford University Press   Steve Coll , “ Directorate S: The C.I.A. and America’s Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan ” Penguin Press / Penguin Random House   Marwan Hisham and Molly Crabapple , “ Brothers of the Gun: A Memoir of the Syrian War ” One World / Penguin Random House   Victoria Johnson , “ American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic ” Liveright / W. W. Norton & Company   David Quammen , “ The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life ” Simon & Schuster   Sarah Smarsh , “ Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth ” Scribner / Simon & Schuster

The full list is below.

Carol Anderson, “One Person, No Vote: How Voter Suppression Is Destroying Our Democracy
Bloomsbury Publishing

Colin G. Calloway, “The Indian World of George Washington: The First President, the First Americans, and the Birth of the Nation
Oxford University Press

Steve Coll, “Directorate S: The C.I.A. and America’s Secret Wars in Afghanistan and Pakistan
Penguin Press / Penguin Random House

Marwan Hisham and Molly Crabapple, “Brothers of the Gun: A Memoir of the Syrian War
One World / Penguin Random House

Victoria Johnson, “American Eden: David Hosack, Botany, and Medicine in the Garden of the Early Republic
Liveright / W. W. Norton & Company

David Quammen, “The Tangled Tree: A Radical New History of Life
Simon & Schuster

Sarah Smarsh, “Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth
Scribner / Simon & Schuster

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An essay by Jesse Lichtenstein, “How Poetry Came to Matter Again,” appears in the September 2018 issue of The Atlantic. “The face of poetry in the United States looks very different today than it did even a decade ago,” writes Lichtenstein, “and far more like the demographics of Millennial America. If anything, the current crop of emerging poets anticipates the face of young America 30 years from now.”

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Poetry Is a Way of Being in the World That Wasn’t Made for Us

New work from 10 poets with disabilities, including Kenny Fries and Sheila Black.

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 Nation magazine poetry editors, apologizing for publishing “How-to,” Anders Carlson-Wee’s misguided dramatic monologue of homelessness.

Nation magazine poetry editors, apologizing for publishing “How-to,” Anders Carlson-Wee’s misguided dramatic monologue of homelessness.

As Grace Schulman writes in a New York Times Op-ed about the Carlson-Wee controversy, “The broader issue here, though, is the backward and increasingly prevalent idea that the artist is somehow morally responsible for his character’s behavior or voice. Writers have always presented characters with unwholesome views; F. Scott Fitzgerald, Charles Dickens and Shakespeare come immediately to mind. One wonders if editors would have the courage to publish Robert Lowell’s ‘Words for Hart Crane’ or Ezra Pound’s ‘Sestina: Altaforte’ today.”